Inga Plönnigs

Hello Inga! Please introduce yourself.

Hi, my name is Inga Plönnigs and I am a type designer based in Berlin. In 2016 I graduated from the Type and Media Master programme at the KABK in The Hague. Since then I am working independently and really enjoying the freedom.

How, when and why did you start working in the type design field?

That would be my internship at FontFont during my bachelor studies in 2014. Back then I was mostly interested in typography and I thought that I wanted to be a graphic designer with an emphasis on type. So I wanted to do an internship where I can learn a lot about typefaces in general. At FontFont, I realised how deep the rabbit hole goes and I felt challenged to understand all of it.

What did your first selfmade typeface look like?

It was a serif text typeface with a broad nib contrast. I wanted to learn about legibility and I thought that it’s best to first learn the basics and then explore exciting shapes later.

How and why did you approach designing your typeface Magnet?

Magnet is my Master graduation project from Type and Media. I was interested in condensed display type and playing with an unconventional kind of contrast, still making something that is very usable. It was mostly about finding a good rhythm and creating a nice pattern. I was also interested in adapting the design features for a usage in smaller sizes. So the typeface family holds two optical sizes, the Poster styles for large usage, and the Text styles that work well in running text.

Typography/Type Design is a pretty male dominated topic. How do you experience that?

True! As far as I know, I haven’t had any disadvantages yet. But I’m very aware of the many women that do great work and do encounter discrimination in some way. I think women have to prove themselves a little bit more than men, just like in every other field.
All I can do is concentrate on my work, making sure it is valuable. And looking out for people that get treated unfairly.

Which song would you like to translate into a typeface? What would that look like?

Good question … for example “Nervous Sleep” by Róisín Murphy. It’s so versatile, it should be captured in a typeface actually. I don’t know how it would look like but it can’t be boring.

How do you feel about the ongoing type design trend and the democratization of type design?

I think it’s great that people are paying more attention to type!
But at the same time, people tend to forget that it’s a very labour intensive craft. Only because you have all the tools available immediately, it doesn’t mean that you developed the skills for it quickly.
It takes a long time to train your eye and see all the things that go wrong when drawing type and there is no way around it.

What’s you favorite typeface at the moment?

To be honest: I never get to use type. I didn’t plan it to be like that, but I am really occupied with drawing type only.
That’s why I don’t have a big library of typefaces. Sometimes I have to use a typeface for a personal project and then I am picking one of my own typefaces in order to get a feeling of how they behave.
Also, I am having a hard time deciding on a favourite. Not only when it comes to typefaces, also colours, cities or movies. You always have to see the things in context.

Could you tell us a bit about the Type and Media Master’s program for people who might be interested?

It’s 10 months only, but you learn as much as in two years. It’s very intense, but also very good.
In the first semester you get to know a lot of various aspects concerning type design. There are workshops in different kind of scripts like Cyrillic, Greek or Arabic. Then there is python coding, stone carving, calligraphy … it’s hands on. So there are a lot of little tasks that prepare you for the second semester.
The second semester is basically just the graduation project. Finding an interesting topic for your project, sketching a lot, trying to find the best solutions for your idea. Every week, several teachers are giving feedback on the current state. Sometimes that’s confusing, because you got five different opinions on your draft and you have to figure out, what works best for you. This way, you learn a lot about decision making.
Everybody is so inspiring and pushes you to do exciting stuff while you don’t have a lot of time, so you have to be pragmatic. At least, that’s how I experienced it and it was really helpful.

For more work of Inga, check out her Instagram or her website !

Daria Petrova

Hello Daria! Please introduce yourself.

I was born in Moscow but have lived in Berlin since 2012, with a one year break spent in the Type and Media M.A. program in The Hague. Since graduating in 2016, I work at LucasFonts during the day and spend my evenings creating weird typefaces and researching all things macabre.

How, when and why did you start working in the type design field?

t’s been a long way. Already in Moscow, where I studied book design, I was always fascinated by type design and especially by the people involved in it. It was Alexander Tarbeev and his workshop that gave me the first insights, even though I was absolutely unable to work in type design back then. I moved to Berlin hoping to learn something new, like web design and UI, but again, it was the people in type design who attracted me more than anything else. Finally I ended up at Lucas de Groot’s course at the Fachhochschule Potsdam. Lucas is an amazing teacher — very motivating, and he was kind enough to offer me an internship at his studio, where I finally realized that type design is the thing I want to spent my life doing.

What did your first selfmade typeface look like?

It was an “oh-I-have-a-very-unusual-idea-to-make-a-font-with-inverted-contrast” trap. Believe me, it was quite an ugly one.

How and why did you approach designing your typeface Zangezi?

Zangezi was my second typeface. I quickly digitized one weirdo called Salem I found in an old specimen at my beloved www.archive.org and abandoned it. A few years later I encountered it again and got very interested in exploring its quirky existence. I think the original typeface totally deserves not to be forgotten, but it also inspired me to come up with some completely new designs, like italic and sans.

Typography/Type Design is a pretty male dominated topic. How do you experience that?

Personally I’m lucky not to experience it myself, since it is no longer such an issue in Europe or North America. But I hope that one day this will change in my homeland, too, where gender roles are still quite traditional.

Which song would you like to translate into a typeface? What would that look like?

I often connect music and curves, because I think they share the same level of abstractness. This is very subjective, but I know exactly what Zangezi sounds like — the nervous and penetrating harpsichord of “Le Vertigo” by Joseph-Nicolas-Pancrace Royer — just imagine, it’s 1746!
I would like to reflect more on French Baroque music, by composers like Jean-Baptiste Lully or Jean-Philippe Rameau. I think they are more witty, exalted, and nervous than a Baroque Antiqua, for example. Another goal of mine is to create a very pathetically and sentimental Russian typeface, like the quintessence of Russian classical music (to name a few examples: Tchaikovsky’s “Violin Concerto in D Major”; Borodin’s “In the Steppes of Central Asia”; Shostakovich’s “Waltz No. 2” … I think I have to stop).

How do you feel about the ongoing type design trend and the democratization of type design?

I see the democratization very enthusiastically and hope that this tendency will de-marginalize crazy display fonts. And my biggest hope for achieving this is FutureFonts. Let’s have a modern take on Victorian typography!

What’s you favorite typeface at the moment?

In the last four years I have barely gotten to use fonts. The last one that I happened to use was Operator by Andy Clymer, and I loved it. I sometimes buy typefaces I adore, but can’t find a purpose for them, besides sheer admiration, like WF Regular and WF Sans by Yuri Gordon.

What’s more important to you, the perfect shape or what the typeface feels like?

I leave all the perfect shapes at work. In the afterwork hours I am looking for slightly rough curves and overall feeling. My biggest struggle is to find a balance — how not to over-rationalize shapes, but also not to make them feel just sloppy.

For more work of Daria check out her Instagram or buy her Typeface Zangezi at Futurefonts !

Mateo Broillet

Mateo Broillet

Hello Mateo! Please introduce yourself.

Hi, I am Mateo Broillet, I am from French Switzerland and I am currently based in Amsterdam for almost three years now. I just graduated from the Sandberg Instituut with a Master of Arts in Fine arts and Design. I previously worked during a few years and did my BA at ECAL in Lausanne, also Switzerland.

How, when and why did you start working in the type design field?

I would say that I am perhaps a bit more a graphic designer involved in typography than a type designer. I am still pretty much interested in editorial concepts and in the overall graphic design thingy. My first contact with type design was during the mandatory courses that we’ve all had at Ecal in Lausanne, during my bachelor education in graphic design. To be honest, I didn’t really catch on at the time with the way type was taught (I was also quite terrible). I slowly started to implement more typography - working solely with type - on my editorial projects there during the third and last year and specially after graduating.
During my internship at onlab and even more at Studio Joost Grootens in Amsterdam, I got to touch a bit more on type itself, but the real kickstarter has been the start of my studies at the Sandberg Instituut. In fact, the possibility to work for the school as a graphic designer and the structure of the MA left me with plenty of time to spend on something as time-consuming as typography.

What did your first selfmade typeface look like?

My first serious fully self-made typeface is “Hermance” made during my free-time while at Studio Joost Grootens in 2015. This type project was a kind of mash-up of Grecian style typefaces from the late 19th century and a quite clear reference to 60s-70s Dutch modernism.

How and why did you approach designing your typeface Nero? How do you see it’s use by others?

Nero is at the beginning an attempt to have an alternative typeface to the (in)famous Adobe font Trajan, strangely widely used in the western political spectrum. While speaking with the tutors at the Sandberg Instituut, we found quite interesting to analyse what is the current affect of the supplied Microsoft/Apple fonts. Since I was at that time designing a micro-edited pamphlet about the possibility of creating a trade union for graphic designers, I found interesting to use this sort of Trajan alternate for it. I then have slowly integrated the lower case letters, but I am still not very happy with it.
However, with the 30x different versions of it, Nero was a wonderful tool for me to learn a bit more about type. And the use of its condensed version, the most used version of it - inspired by Pompeii graffitis - has still a lot of “type potential” I think.

Typography/Type Design is a pretty male dominated topic. Why do you think that is and do you see a change in our generation?

This is really an issue: I don’t really have precise numbers but globally speaking you have now a certain gender equality regarding people studying type. Yet, you’ve mostly hearing of Latin-based male type designer and this is still somehow a problem.

Which song would you like to translate into a typeface? What would that look like?

Difficult question. I am sort of a big fan of Hi-Nrg and I would design an extremely Bold Extended Grostesque font for Shake It Up by Divine!

How do you feel about the ongoing type design trend and the democratization of type design?

At the end, I would say it is pretty much a good thing. Quite simple programs like Glyphs can allow you to practice type easily, without too much prior knowledge of typography, for example when you are starting your graphic design education. On the other hand, the democratization of type design can lead to over-present copypasta aesthetics and for sure a certain manierism pushed by the “fear of missing out”, notably on Instagram. The real threat is more for people trying to get a living from type design: how many type designers can the market accept? At the end, I sincerely hope that the quality will still prevail. Nonetheless, because making and selling a good typeface is quite hard at the end, I don’t think that what happened to the photojournalism sector for example will happen anytime soon to the type design industry.

Whats you favorite typeface at the moment?

I couldn’t name one but I must say I am really impressed by the endless possibilities of the open-source tool made by my former classmate Heikki Lotvonen. http://www.glyphdrawing.club/

For more work of Mateo check out his Instagram!

Sascha Bente

Hello Sascha! Please introduce yourself.

I am Sascha Bente, graphic designer living and working in Berlin. After graduating in visual communication from FH Hannover I started my own design practice in late 2012. Besides I am co-founder of a small menswear label called Adequate Archive and co-publisher of a magazine called ROM (which will be released in June ’18).

How, when and why did you start working in the type design field?

Letters initially made me develop an interest in graphic design I guess. I still remember being thirteen and seeing a calligraphic graffiti-lettering inside a CD booklet for the first time. Even though it sounds somehow romanticized, I consider this moment to be a tipping point of my relation to typography. I started to draw letters quite early but never really professionalized the design-process. So I actually 'work' in this field for maybe two years now.

What did your first selfmade typeface look like?

During my studies in 2011 I developed a non-titled uppercase-only typeface for a project treating psychedelic drug aesthetics. My intention was to use kind of a wavey decorative yet still geometrically shaped typeface. Well, like most first steps, it’s not something I am proud of, but here it is 🙂

How and why did you approach designing your typeface Azurro and what’s the deal the Utopia cut?

Azzurro was a holiday thing. During a vacation in the hills around Lago Di Como, I startet to draw a serif typeface with exaggerated proportions on paper because I liked all the Italian stone engraved Antiqua signs. When it came to the process of digitalization I realized quite fast that my letters wouldn’t work at all – even as a display face. So I decided to use the capitals I already had as a basis for a more readable serif font – but I kept the name.
The Utopia can be seen as a step back. I tried to shape a more lightweight cut for display use containing the exaggerated shapes of my initial draft. After playing around for a while, the Utopia cut was born.



Typography/Type Design is a pretty male dominated topic. Why do you think that is and do you see a change in our generation?

Pretty extensive topic to talk about. My opinion in short is that male domination starts much earlier and is an allover occurring societal problem. And since design always works in context of society, this inequality appears in many cultural fields – only in different scales. I don’t really know what a final solution could be here, but I guess proper education could be a start.

Which song would you like to translate into a typeface? What would that look like?

"Slice me nice“ by Fancy I would say. Cause to be honest, I really have a thing for cheezy Italo Disco Songs and Pop culture references of the 1980s. Could be a self drawn grotesk font on a Trattoria sign or menu-display or something.

How do you feel about the ongoing type design trend and the democratization of type design?

I feel somehow glad because I consider myself a part of it. With all the new software, tools and channels evolved, I rediscovered my enthusiasm in typography and felt encouraged to focus on letters again. Furthermore I like the new easiness coming with a certain social media typemovement. Before, I experienced type design to be a very serious and accurate profession, but now you see some funk, naivety or even humor from time to time.

Whats you favorite typeface at the moment?

At the moment I kinda have a thing for the light cut of the Condensed ITC Garamond.

For more work of Sascha check out his website!

Pauline Le Pape

Hello Pauline! Please introduce yourself.

For a couple of years now my life has been divided between France where I studied, and The Netherlands where I’m currently based. I studied a bachelor of Graphic Design, and a Master of Type Design at École Estienne. After a good time as intern at Atelier Roosje Klap in Amsterdam I decided to stay and mostly work with Roosje.

How, when and why did you start working in the type design field?

My interest in type design started when I studied graphic design on the first place. Even though I’m most of the time a graphic designer, I like to switch from a practice to another. I think both of them feed a specific part of my need and desire at work.

What did your first selfmade typeface look like?

The first typeface I realised in 2013 was an exercise initiated by my former graphic design teacher Emmanuel Benoist where we had to make a typeface made of a few modules. I wanted my modules to be a series of shapes inspired by calligraphy in order to not make it look too systematic or stiff. It’s quite ugly but in a way the process is something I could still use!

How do you approach designing Typefaces? Do you think a typeface needs an intellectual concept or is a formal concept sufficient?

I think both are legitimate, I guess the difference is that in a formal concept you are probably more flexible in the way the typeface evolves through the process. A formal concept can be also a good way to guide your own project. For instance, the first typeface I’ve been working on during the master was a revival of the first Italic designed by Alde Manuce. The exercise of the revival is in a way very formal, ruled, but also a good protocol to find interesting letters, shapes and typographic solutions.

Typography/Type Design is a pretty male dominated topic. Why do you think that is and do you see a change in our generation?

In my opinion the most confusing thing about this ratio is that it doesn’t really exist within the educational institutions, but becomes a reality in the professional world. When I was studying, we were as many women as men, but I guess the difference resides in the ability of each to feel legitimate in a practice that has been traditionally male dominated. Hopefully, I think this is slowly changing! For instance, the two last type designers that were chosen to work on the public commission of the CNAP in France were Sandrine Nugue in 2014 and Alice Savoie in 2018. The project consists of the design of a new typeface within the frame of Graphisme en France in order to promote the field of type design in France, as well as to provide a freely downloadable typeface. I believe that the scene becomes more gender equal, and it will inspire a lot more designers like us in the future.

Do you see a gender in your own designs?

I don’t especially see a gender in my design, I can recognize a culture and environment rather than a gender.

Which song would you like to translate into a typeface? What would that look like?

It would be USA FOR AFRICA — We are the world, where every caracter tries to make the best of themselves and in a very bold way, within a very short space and time of appearance. Stevie Wonder would be my favorite letter.

Virgile Flores

Virgile Flores

Hello Virgile! Please introduce yourself.

I’m an independent and Paris based art director and graphic designer graduated last year. Now I’m completing my studies by specializing in type design, while continuing to work on my own.

How, when and why did you start working in the type design field?

I started to focus on type design towards the end of my previous course. I felt the need to better choose the typeface I was using for my projects, but I also needed to create my own letters, or at least be able to customize existing ones, for logotypes of lettering stuff. I had calligraphy classes and that's one of the things that pushed me to go further in the process. There is a real synergy between graphic and type design. There is also something mystical about typing text with shapes drawn by yourself.

What did your first selfmade typeface look like?

I did my first typeface at the Love Letters workshop with Sebastian San Filippo. I named it Laeken. It is a bold humanist sans serif typeface with ink traps. I hope I could finish it someday, the more I get into type design and the more I find things to improve. I guess I’m not the only one struggling with this problem !

How do you approach designing Typefaces? Do you think a typeface needs an intellectual concept or is a formal concept sufficient?

 I do not think there is a need for a particular concept. Except when the project is for a client. Every day, graphic designers use typefaces and appropriate their narratives, their shapes, for very different needs. From a personal point of view, I start a typeface when I need it for a project I'm working on, and for which I need a particular form. As a result, it often gives a display typeface. I’m searching for new forms, or I take parts of existing forms that have not, in my opinion, been explored.

Typography/Type Design is a pretty male dominated topic. How do you experience that?

First, there is a whole religious history linked to writing deprived of women (ancient Egypt, copyist monks…). After that, with craftsmanship, Gutemberg machines or 20th century compositing machines, jobs related to typography were manual and therefore reserved for men. I think these are outdated habits that dissipate over time. All of this is accelerating with the accessibility of IT and new softwares. Now, we do not need to go through school and companies sculpted by time and traditions to do this kind of job. I know more women than men studying type design. So I think it's something that would change in a short time.

Do you see a gender in your own designs?

Often, people reaching me think that I am a woman. It may be due to my unusual name, or maybe my work. You tell me !

Which song would you like to translate into a typeface? What would that look like?

Maybe not a song in particular. I would do something really experimental, almost an abstract typeface for Laurel Halo’s Dust album, or maybe Hesaitix from M.E.S.H.

How do you think new technologies like responsive or kinetic typefaces will change classic graphic design?

With my school, we had the chance to talk with Dan Rhatigan who works at Adobe Typekit. We talked about variable fonts. For him, the variables causes too many choices for the designers. This is too complex to allow easy typographic style sharing. So it won’t revolutionize the field. However, it is a great help to refine some settings, such as adding fat when on a black background for example.  From a personal point of view I am very interested in these new technologies. I find it exciting, but I think that what we see is only a transition for a much more exciting phase.

Margot Leveque

Margot Leveque

Hello Margot! Please introduce yourself.

Hi Charlotte ! I started working two years ago as a freelance graphic designer. I’m based in Paris at the moment. I am also a student in a type design master at ECV Paris supervised by Jean François Porchez and his team.

How, when and why did you start working in the type design field?

This is the first year learning full time how to draw typefaces. Already being a graphic designer, I wanted to do type design to be able to take more freedom in my job, not being trapped by several fonts, and also be able to draw custom logotypes for example. For me, a good graphic designer is a good type designer. My goal is not to become a full time type designer, but only to become a (good) graphic designer!

What did your first selfmade typeface look like? Feel free to send an image 🙂

I did not know much about typography, so before moving into a typographic master, I decided to take a weekend in February 2017 for a workshop, offered by Sebastien San Filippo in Brussels (Love-Letters). During this workshop I did my first revival, Stane. I was quite satisfied by the result, except that I did revers the serif of the d. We had a good laugh about that. 

How and why did you approach designing your typeface Reliqua?

My first typeface, Reliqua, has been designed from September to November 2017. And it is not finished yet. I would like to finalize it with what I would have learned during my master's degree, and why not selling it after that. It is a school project where we had to take inspiration from a Parisian spot or monument. I chose the Sainte-Chapelle, a historical monument, for its beauty, its mystery, its curves. I immersed myself on the spot, questioned people, trying to understand this place as a whole. Finally, my design is built using the architectural codes of the place. For the last step, I changed the endings giving it a more baroque atmosphere.  I had a lot of requests for Reliqua. It was really surprising and satisfying to have this kind of return for my first vectorized typeface !

Typography/Type Design is a pretty male dominated topic. How do you experience that?

At the present time, with social networks and internet, I do not have this feeling that typography is a medium where men dominate. I am aware that this was the case (and that it always is), but naively I remain convinced that behind the forms, the question of gender does not exist. Take the test on Instagram: if we hide the account’s name, would you be able to recognize the gender of the designer ? For me, in design, everything is allowed. Typography is a material where the curve is neither masculine nor feminine!

Do you see a gender in your own designs?

This question is not obvious, haha. I don’t really see a gender. If a female graphic is reduced to color patterns, and the masculine to typography with a predominance of black and white, then my design is masculine ! It doesn’t matter. For me graphic design does not raise the question of gender, but of personality.

Which song would you like to translate into a typeface? What would that look like?

Tribute to the French singer France Gall : "Résiste"

How do you feel about the ongoing type design trend and the democratization of type design?

There are many trends, especially visible on Instagram. I think it's a good thing because the networks allow us to go further, to inspire and be inspired, but above all permits great visibility. It's a chance for my generation. At the present time, we can reach clients more easily, and we can be visible with a single project, without being a big foundry or a massive studio. On the other hand, I think that we must keep the "feet on the ground" and not see only that. We can be easily tricked by likes and followers about the real design quality. We are quickly seduced by the likes and the notoriety. It remains very subjective.

Andreas Uebele

Foto: Joachim Baldauf

Bitte stell Dich kurz vor.

andreas uebele ist andreas uebele
(nach harry rowohlt)

Wie sieht Ihre Lehre aus? Was wollen Sie Ihren Studenten im Kern vermitteln?

haltung
handwerk
heulen

Wie hast Du Schriftgestaltung (Typographie) für Dich entdeckt?

writing love letters
discovering letter love
((müsste man vielleich mal richtig ins englische übertragen))

Welche war Deine erste Lieblingsschrift?

bodoni

Was macht eine Schrift für Dich sexy?

öi! kurven, baibi. und wenn sie etwas zickig sind.

Sollte man Schriftgestalter und Graphikdesigner gleichzeitig sein oder sich auf eins konzentrieren? Hast Du einen guten Ratschlag für angehende Schriftgestalter?

man kann nur eine sache richtig gut machen. der schriftgestalter versenkt sich ins detail und der grafikdesigner muss neben dem detail auch das große ganze im auge haben. bei dem einen ist die form vorgegeben, der andere muss neue formen erfinden. jaok. es gab ein paar ausnahmen, die beides gut konnten, otl aicher, wim crouwel und karl gerstner. aber bei aicher und gerstner könnte man sagen, dass das sehr gute designer waren, die AUCH mal eine schrift gemacht haben und die schriften von crouwel sind ja eher keine satzschriften im herkömmlichen sinne. bei der gestaltung der massimo sind wir einen (ungeplanten) anderen weg gegangen: meine freihandzeichnungen der buchstaben von 250 briefen aus rom wurden kongenial von dem schriftgestalter gabriel richter in eine satzschrift übersetzt.

Zu welchem Song würdest Du gerne mal eine Schrift gestalten?

kling klong rzzzzz fffft krchz

Warum und wie sähe die aus?

erikaviolett

In welche Dimensionen könnte Schriftgestaltung expandieren?

weiter
schneller
höher

Wie könnte die Schriftgestaltung der Zukunft aussehen?

schöner
brutaler
kühler

Wie würdest Du die Vernetzung unter Gestaltern aktuell beschreiben und wie könnte sie sich entwickeln bzw verbessern?

seid nett zueinander

www.uebele.com

New Letters

Bitte stell Dich kurz vor. Schick gerne ein Photo von Dir mit.

New Letters ist eine deutsche Typefoundry und Design Studio, welches 2015 von Armin Brenner und Markus John gegründet wurde. Das Studio fokussiert sich auf Typografie, Grafik Design und Art Direction im Kontext von kulturellen und kommerziellen Projekten. Der typografische Umgang spielt dabei die zentrale Rolle – dafür bieten wir zeitgenössische sowie individuell beauftragte Schriften an. New Letters spannt einen Bogen zwischen klassischen Schriften mit einem Blick für Details sowie modernen Ansatz, welcher Ihren Schriften in einem zeitgenössischen Kontext präsentiert.

Wie hast Du Schriftgestaltung (Typographie) für Dich entdeckt?

Angefangen hat alles während des Studiums an der HfG in Schwäbisch Gmünd. Dort dient das Fach Typografie eher als Grundlagenfach und wir mussten uns die Grundlagen der Typografie und Schriftgestaltung autodidaktisch beibringen. Die HFG hat uns in sofern geprägt, dass Typografie als wichtige Grundlage von Gestaltung angesehen wird. Da wir beide vor dem Studium schon eine Leidenschaft für Typografie entwickelt hatten, konnten wir diese während des Studiums weiterentwickeln. So tasteten wir uns im Duo gemeinsam an unsere erste Schrift Tilde heran, welche es in der Zwischenzeit weiterentwickelt und in vielen weiteren Schnitten gibt. 

Welche war Deine erste Lieblingsschrift?

Armin: Akzidenz Grotesk
Markus:  Lubalin Graph

Was macht eine Schrift für Dich sexy?

Armin: Kurven
Markus: Eine steile Italic 😉

Wie sah Deine erste eigene Schrift aus? Schick gerne Bilder, falls Du welche hast!

Wir haben uns an eigene Schriften herangetastet indem wir bestehende Schriften modifiziert haben. Meist klassische Schriften wie „Futura“ oder „Helvetica“. Dabei haben wir besipielsweise Punzen gefüllt, Buchstaben gespiegelt, Oder mit der x-höhe gespielt. Dadurch haben wir viel über Typografie gelernt um das Wissen später dann mit eigenen Schriften zu erweitern. Eine unserer ersten Schriften war die Geometrische Schrift Tilde.

Wie gestaltest Du heute Schriften? Woran orientierst Du Dich, was ist Dir wichtig?

Sehr wichtig war und sind für uns Einflüsse aus unterschiedlichsten Kontexten. Es herrscht immer eine starke Verbindung zu kreativen Bereichen wie Architektur, Kunst und Mode. Da unsere Schriften auch eine zeitgemäße Ästhetik repräsentieren, wirken viele Einflüsse darauf ein. Viel Inspiration nehmen wir auch aus der alltäglichen Arbeit als Grafik Designer. 
Bei vielen Projekten haben wir das Gefühl dass eine eigene Schrift den Charakter des Projektes prägen kann. Wenn wir mit einer neuen Schrift starten, geht dem Ganzen ein längerer Prozess der Inspiration voraus. Wenn wir erste Buchstaben zeichnen, wissen wir schon grob wo das Ganze hingehen soll. Während des Designprozesses durchläuft die Schrift mehrere Stationen in den wir nochmals Grundlegende Details in Frage stellen, die für uns bei einer Schrift wichtig sind. Meistens arbeiten wir zu zweit an einem Basis Schnitt, den wir dann erst später ausbauen. 

Sollte man Schriftgestalter und Graphikdesigner gleichzeitig sein oder sich auf eins konzentrieren? Hast Du einen guten Ratschlag für angehende Schriftgestalter?

Für uns war es immer ein Vorteil gleichzeitig Grafikdesigner sowie Schriftgestalter zu sein. Da unser Grafik Design sehr von Typografie geprägt ist, Ergänzen sich diese beiden Berufe. Als Grafikdesigner der gleichzeitig Schriften entwickelt, kann man diese in seine Projekte einfließen lassen und somit gleich „In Use“ testen. Das ist manchmal auch hilfreich, wenn man für kleinere Projekte Schriften benötigt. Des Weiteren ist es als „Typefoundry“ wichtig seine Schriften in ihrer Anwendung zu Präsentieren und Printmedien wie zum Beispiel „Specimen“ zu gestalten. Als Grafikdesigner hat man gleichzeitig auch mehr Gefühl dafür was bei einer Schrift wichtig sein könnte, wie z.B. unterschiedliche Schnitte oder erweiterte Glyphensätze. Grundlegen haben wir für angehende Schriftgestalter den Tipp, das Ganze nicht zu sehr als Business zu sehen, sondern seiner Leidenschaft eine Plattform zu geben um sich damit auch austauschen zu können.

Zu welchem Song würdest Du gerne mal eine Schrift gestalten? Warum und wie sähe die aus?

Wir haben eigentlich keinen spezifischen Lieblingssong sondern sind meistens auf der Suche nach neuer Musik. So verhält es sich auch bei unseren Schriften, wir haben nicht die eine Lieblingsschrift sondern versuchen immer etwas neues zu entdecken.

In welche Dimensionen könnte Schriftgestaltung expandieren? Wie könnte die Schriftgestaltung der Zukunft aussehen?

Wir denken in Zukunft wird die Anwendung von Schrift noch mehr digital stattfinden. Dafür muss es auch neue Ideen geben, „Variable Fonts“ sind hier zum Beispiel ein schöner Ansatz. Auch das Animieren von bewegter Schrift wird zunehmen. Zudem werden kleine Typefoundries an Gewicht gewinnen und mehr alternative Schriften auf den Markt bringen.

Wie würdest Du die Vernetzung unter Gestaltern aktuell beschreiben und wie könnte sie sich entwickeln bzw verbessern?

Durch die vielen kreativen Festivals findet aktuell schon eine starke Vernetzung zwischen Gestaltern statt. Auch kreative Plattformen und alternative Wege der Zusammenarbeit wie „Co-working Spaces“ haben in den letzten Jahren die Zusammenarbeit zwischen unterschiedlichen Feldern des Grafik Design gestärkt. Wir haben das Gefühl dass die Grafikdesign Szene keinem starken Konkurrenz Druck unterlegen ist, wie es bei grossen Werbeagenturen der Fall ist.  

www.new-letters.de

Johannes Breyer

Foto: Mirka Laura Severa, Amsterdam, 2013

Bitte stell Dich kurz vor. Schick gerne ein Photo von Dir mit.

Johannes Breyer, Grafik- und Typedesigner aus Berlin. Studium in Zürich und Amsterdam. Mitgründer der Typefoundry Dinamo.

Frage?

Die Schrift als Format und Material zu begreifen, auf welches man kontextspezifische Gesten anwenden und unbemerkte Zugänge sichtbar machen kann.

Wie hast Du Schriftgestaltung (Typographie) für Dich entdeckt?

Zeitgleich mit der Entdeckung der Grafik.

Welche war Deine erste Lieblingsschrift?

OCR B von Adrian Frutiger

Was macht eine Schrift für Dich sexy?

wenn sie ohne Zwang daherkommt

Wie sah Deine erste eigene Schrift aus? Schick gerne Bilder, falls Du welche hast!

Sehr modular natürlich, relativ unpersönlich ebenfalls

Wie gestaltest Du heute Schriften? Woran orientierst Du Dich, was ist Dir wichtig?

Mir ist wichtig, dass jeder Schriftentwurf die ihm – wenn auch noch so so absurde, oder umso absurder umso besser! – zugrundeliegende Idee verfolgt. Auch finde ich es wichtig, dass jeder Entwurf durch seine Art, Zeichnung oder Technik, etwas über den aktuellen Stand des Gebiets Typedesign verrät, und diesen weitertreibt.

In welche Dimensionen könnte Schriftgestaltung expandieren? Wie könnte die Schriftgestaltung der Zukunft aussehen?

3D, organisch, von äusseren Parametern abhängig konstant die Form verändernd

Wie würdest Du die Vernetzung unter Gestaltern aktuell beschreiben und wie könnte sie sich entwickeln bzw verbessern?

ich empfinde es als eine generell recht offene, mobile und gut vernetzte Truppe

www.johannesbreyer.com